Nº. 1 of  37

eye burfi

South Asian/Indian Art, Illustration, Design & Typography.

Watercolour of a bridge four miles south of Delhi on the Mathura road, Company School painting by an anonymous artist working in the Delhi style, part of the Hyde Collection, c. 1820-1826. Via ogimages.bl.uk

Watercolour of a bridge four miles south of Delhi on the Mathura road, Company School painting by an anonymous artist working in the Delhi style, part of the Hyde Collection, c. 1820-1826. Via ogimages.bl.uk

Commemoration of Shahpour Bonyad, poster by Iranian designer Morteza Mahallati, 2006, via www.odatv.com

Commemoration of Shahpour Bonyad, poster by Iranian designer Morteza Mahallati, 2006, via www.odatv.com

Hafiz, poster by Iranian designer Homa Delvarai, 2008, via www.odatv.com

Hafiz, poster by Iranian designer Homa Delvarai, 2008, via www.odatv.com

Ramkatha painting for the Gond tribal version of the Ramayana, via www.ignca.nic.in

Ramkatha painting for the Gond tribal version of the Ramayana, via www.ignca.nic.in

Ramkatha painting for the Gond tribal version of the Ramayana, via www.ignca.nic.in.

Ramkatha painting for the Gond tribal version of the Ramayana, via www.ignca.nic.in.

bcagalleries:

Madhubani - Traditional Art

Tibetan Wheel of Life (line drawing), via www.fwbo-nyc.org

Tibetan Wheel of Life (line drawing), via www.fwbo-nyc.org

Tibetan manuscript, via www.asianart.com

Tibetan manuscript, via www.asianart.com

Srid pa ho (Divination Chart), Tibet, late twentieth century. Paint on cloth.  Via www.loc.gov

Tibetan astrology depicts the signs and symbols of the universe in this traditional format, possibly introduced from China as early as the seventh century and popular in Tibet since the seventeenth century. The central figure is a large golden tortoise, representing the Bodhisattva of Knowledge, upon whom are drawn various geomantic diagrams, such as the nine magic squares and symbols of the eight planets. This type of Thangka is often hung in homes for protection and displayed for special occasions.

Srid pa ho (Divination Chart), Tibet, late twentieth century. Paint on cloth. Via www.loc.gov

Tibetan astrology depicts the signs and symbols of the universe in this traditional format, possibly introduced from China as early as the seventh century and popular in Tibet since the seventeenth century. The central figure is a large golden tortoise, representing the Bodhisattva of Knowledge, upon whom are drawn various geomantic diagrams, such as the nine magic squares and symbols of the eight planets. This type of Thangka is often hung in homes for protection and displayed for special occasions.

Bhutan: Punakha Dzong Protection mandala, or Srid-Pa-Ho. A diagram of divination, depicting the patterns of the Eight Trigrams (eight combinations of three lines, formerly used in divination) and the 12 symbolic animals of Chinese astrology, around the central figure of a large golden tortoise, representing the Bodhisattva of Knowledge.

via lh3.ggpht.com

Bhutan: Punakha Dzong Protection mandala, or Srid-Pa-Ho. A diagram of divination, depicting the patterns of the Eight Trigrams (eight combinations of three lines, formerly used in divination) and the 12 symbolic animals of Chinese astrology, around the central figure of a large golden tortoise, representing the Bodhisattva of Knowledge.

via lh3.ggpht.com

Painted 19th century Tibetan mandala of the Naropa tradition, Vajrayogini stands in the center of two crossed red triangles. Via upload.wikimedia.org

Painted 19th century Tibetan mandala of the Naropa tradition, Vajrayogini stands in the center of two crossed red triangles. Via upload.wikimedia.org

Japanese Shuji Mandara, via www.ysbla.org.tw

Japan’s esoteric sects employ a mandala called the Shuji Mandara, or Seed-Syllable Mandala in which the deities are symbolized by their individual seed syllables.  The seed syllable (Japanese, Shuji 種字; Sanskrit, Bijaksara) invokes the essence of the deity. In Japan, Sanskrit seed syllables are written in a script called Shittan 悉曇 (Siddham in Sanskrit) which is derived from the Indian Brahmi script.

Japanese Shuji Mandara, via www.ysbla.org.tw

Japan’s esoteric sects employ a mandala called the Shuji Mandara, or Seed-Syllable Mandala in which the deities are symbolized by their individual seed syllables. The seed syllable (Japanese,
Shuji 種字; Sanskrit, Bijaksara) invokes the essence of the deity. In Japan, Sanskrit seed syllables are written in a script called Shittan 悉曇 (Siddham in Sanskrit) which is derived from the Indian Brahmi script.

Panchen Lama Refuge Tree. Tibet, nineteenth century. Via lh3.ggpht.com

Panchen Lama Refuge Tree. Tibet, nineteenth century. Via lh3.ggpht.com

Visharupa (cosmic form) of Heruka in Yab Yum, via www.exoticindiaart.com

Visharupa (cosmic form) of Heruka in Yab Yum, via www.exoticindiaart.com

Nº. 1 of  37